Pupil Premium

What is the pupil premium?

The Pupil Premium provides additional funding on top of the main funding a school receives. It is targeted at students from disadvantaged backgrounds to ensure they benefit from the same opportunities as pupils from less deprived families. Currently, the premium is worth £1320 and goes to students who are currently on Free School Meals (FSM) or has been registered for (FSM) in the past six years,  students in care, who have been looked after by local authorities for more than six months also continue to qualify for the Pupil Premium.

Why is there a pupil premium?

Students who have been eligible for Free School Meals at any point in their school career have consistently lower educational attainment than those who have never been eligible. In 2009-10 GCSE statistics showed that around a third of students who have been on Free School Meals in the previous six years achieved five or more A*- C grades, compared to more than two thirds of their fellow students.

How will the impact of the spending of the Pupil Premium be measured?

At Horn Park School, the usual cycle of data collection and the monitoring and tracking of attainment, will be used to inform progress and enable the early identification of need, support and appropriate intervention.

Schools receive designated pupil premium funding to support vulnerable children within the school.  Schools are free to decide how to allocate this funding to best support and raise the attainment for the most vulnerable pupils.

Summary Information

School

Horn Park Primary School

Academic Year

2016/17

Total Pupil Premium Budget

£211,500

Date of most recent PP review

July 2016

Total number of Pupils

424

Number of Pupils eligible for pupil premium

153

Date for next internal review

July 2017

 

Current Attainment

 

School

National

 

PP

Non PP

PP

Non PP

EYFS Good Level of Development

80%

83%

 

 

Year 1 Phonics

58%

82%

 

 

Key Stage 1 – Reading - Expected Level

75%

85%

 

 

Key Stage 1 – Reading - Greater Depth

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 1 – Writing - Expected Level

75%

79%

 

 

Key Stage 1 – Writing - Greater Depth

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 1 – Maths - Expected Level

81%

91%

 

 

Key Stage 1 – Maths - Greater Depth

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 1- Combined reading, Writing and Maths – Expected Level

75%

79%

 

 

Key Stage 1- Combined reading, Writing and Maths – Greater Depth

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 1 - Science

92%

82%

 

 

Key Stage 2 – Reading - Expected Level

73%

76%

 

 

Key Stage 2 – Reading – Higher Standard

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 2 – Writing - Expected Level

87%

88%

 

 

Key Stage 2 – Writing - Greater Depth

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 2– Maths - Expected Level

76%

80%

 

 

Key Stage 2 – Maths - Higher Standard

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 2– GPS- Expected Level

73%

82%

 

 

Key Stage 2 – GPS- Higher Standard

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 2– Science- Expected Level

73%

76%

 

 

Key Stage 2- Combined reading, Writing and Maths – Expected Level

67%

71%

 

 

Key Stage 2- Combined reading, Writing and Maths – Higher Standard

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 2- Progress Scores - Reading

-0.5

0.8

 

 

Key Stage 2- Progress Scores -Writing

1.9

0.6

 

 

Key Stage 2- Progress Scores -Maths

-0.8

1.5

 

 

 

 

Barriers to future attainment

In-school barriers

A

Limited development of fine and gross motor skills on entry slows progress in other areas of learning

B

Oral language skills in the early years and year one is lower for those pupils entitled to pupil premium. This slows down progress across the curriculum

C

A lack of exposure to rich and varied language slows down progress in English for pupil premium children across the school

D

Higher achieving children entitled to pupil premium make less progress than other higher ability pupils across key stage 2

E

A number of children entitled to pupil premium have social, emotional and behavioural issues that have a detrimental impact on their academic progress

External barriers

F

Attendance and lateness of children entitled to Pupil Premium is lower than non-pupil premium, reducing the time spent in school and creating learning gaps.

G

Social disadvantage can manifest in limited aspirations and a lack of parental engagement. Children may not be exposed to rich and varied life experiences.

 

 

Outcomes

 

Desired Outcome

Success Criteria

A

Improved fine and gross motor skills for children in nursery and reception

By the end of EYFS Pupils entitled to pupil premium reach or exceed age expectations as a result of making rapid progress

B

Improved oral language skills for pupil premium children in reception and year 1

Children eligible for pupil premium make rapid progress so that all children eligible for pupil premium meet or exceed age related expectations

C

Improved vocabulary leads to greater understanding and interpretation of texts, which can also be seen in improved writing outcomes

At the end of key stage two children entitled to pupil premium reach or exceed national expectations as a result of making rapid progress

D

Higher achieving pupil premium children make increased progress

Children eligible for pupil premium make as much or more progress as non-pupil premium children by the end of key stage 2.

E

Improved emotional resilience amongst pupil premium children

Children eligible for pupil premium display resilience

There are fewer behavior incidences recorded for these children

F

Increased attendance and punctuality for pupil premium children

Pupil premium attendance increases from 95.4 to 96.0

The lateness of pupil premium children decreases

The number of persistent absentees among those eligible for pupil premium decreases. Currently of the 29 persistent absentees 62% are children eligible for pupil premium.

G

Increased access to rich and varied life experiences raises pupil and parent expectations

Children and families value education, aspirations are raised.

A higher percentage of pupil premium children exceed national expectations.

 

 

Planned Expenditure –  Academic Year 2016/17

Quality of teaching for all

Desired Outcome

Activity

Rationale

Implementation

Staff lead

Review

Improved fine and gross motor skills for children in nursery and reception

· Staff training

·Purchase motivating equipment to promote the development of gross and fine motor skills

· Set up engaging provision that promotes the development of gross and fine motor skills which is regularly reviewed in line with children’s interests

·Focused interventions for key children

Improved fine and gross motor skills ensures that children have well developed fundamental skills to support them across all areas of the curriculum

Staff training for key interventions

Learning walks and planning monitoring to ensure purposeful provision

Jayne Redman

 

Jan 2017

Improved oral language skills in the early years

· Staff training – Together in communication

· Support to introduce new tracking system

· SALT training

Improved language skills in the early years will provide a firm basis to ensure good progress.

Ensure adequate time and supervision ensures clarity of assessment

Organise ongoing support with planning and interventions from SALT

Sinead Reynolds

June 2017

Improved vocabulary leads to greater understanding and interpretation of texts, which can also be seen in improved writing outcomes

· High quality texts

· Explicit vocabulary teaching

· Interventions for key children pre and post vocabulary teaching

· Implementation of whole class teaching of reading

Children who lack a rich and varied vocabulary are at an immediate disadvantage in their ability to develop a deep understanding of a range of text genres

English lead to support with modeling and planning of whole class reading teaching

Ensure children have access to a good range of high quality texts both on paper and electronic

Monitoring planning to ensure clear and explicit vocabulary teaching

Zoe Crosland

June 2017

The gap between pupil premium and non pupil premium children working at greater depth is narrowed

· Staff training on developing comprehension skills

· Staff training and ongoing support for providing high quality feedback

· Group reading circle

· Small group sessions extending maths

Research indicates that high quality feedback is an effective method for approving attainment

English lead to model and support with planning and teaching

Regular book looks and feedback

 

Zoe Crosland

June 2017

To develop provision to improve children’s emotional and mental health and well being, ensuring children are better able to access learning

 

· Training and resources to develop staff understanding of mindfulness

· Pastoral leader – work with outside agencies in supporting vulnerable families

· Learning mentor – supporting children to remove barriers to learning, leading social skills, anger management, learning skills intervention groups

· Nurture group for key children

· Parents group working with learning mentor

The emotional resilience of groups of pupils across the school is low and acts as a barrier to academic progress

· Observing nurture group in other school

· Ensure clear entrance and exit procedures to enable the monitoring of impact

· Ensure supervision opportunities for key staff

Rebecca Gittins

July 2017

Socially disadvantaged children participate in additional musical opportunities, further supporting progress across the curriculum.

· Musical instrument taster sessions provided by music specialist to children in year 5 and 6

· Support to ensure children in KS2 are able to access individual or small group music lessons

· As acknowledged in point 143 of the DfE’s ‘The Importance of Music’, instrumental tuition can dramatically improve attainment in reading for all children, with a particular impact for those with lower starting points.

 

Access to instruments

Avenues to identify and support gifted and talented musicians

Resourcing musicians

Designated curriculum time for choir to be timetabled in within the school day

Source opportunities to perform

Charlotte Brennan

July 2017

Ensure children have equality of provision at all key stages, immersing the children in up to date technologies.

Purchase of:

· further books for Kindles

· new IPADS

 

Lunch time clubs to enable children without IT equipment at home to access online learning resources

· Children’s access to and  engagement with new technologies will ensure further support progression across all subject areas.

Clear timetables to ensure maximum usage

Support with planning meaningful IT opportunities

Staff and space to lead lunch clubs

Chloe Marriott

May 2016

 

Targeted Support

Desired Outcome

Activity

Rationale

Implementation

Staff lead

Review

·         Children’s gaps are closed quickly as a result of focus teaching

·         The gap between outcomes of pupil premium and non pupil premium children continues to close

 

· Focus interventions lead by highly trained support staff

· Specialist teacher 

· Booster classes before and after school, and Easter holidays

Targeted Support – providing focused 1:1 and small group teaching to close learning gaps in core subject areas and raise the number of children securing national expectations

Clear entry and exit criteria

Opportunities for joint planning

Rebecca Gittins

June 2017

 

Other Approaches

Desired Outcome

Activity

Rationale

Implementation

Staff lead

Review

Attendance of PP children is in line or above that of non PP children

 

Attendance officer to target key families

Ensuring home visits and support are on offer

Attendance celebrations – end of term award

Improve the participation of pupil premium children in a range of extended school provisions

Improving attendance for disadvantaged groups will increase time spent at school and

 

Inclusion AHT to oversee and support pastoral lead

Opportunities for home visits

Reviewing interests of pupil premium children to encourage engagement in extended provision

 

 

Tashana Eg

July 2017

Improving nutrition of disadvantaged children

Fresh milk to be provided for pupil premium children

This has been a government requirement since January

Ensure milk is stored and available

Maggie Selman

July 2017

Increased access to rich and varied life experiences raises pupil and parent expectations

Opportunities to access visits to a range of places of interest

Residential school journey year 5 and 6

Visits from a range of professionals to discuss career opportunities

Children have knowledge of a wider range of career and life opportunities raising aspirations

Source community mentors

Create a bank of workers across the community to share experiences

Create transparent systems for support with school journey cost

Helen Weighell

July 2017

 

Review of expenditure – Academic year 2015/16

Desired Outcome

Chosen approach

Impact

Lessons learnt

Cost

To develop provision to improve children’s emotional and mental health

 

Targeted children have access to therapeutic and social/emotional intervention

CAMHS buy in

Parents course -  ‘discover me’

 

Mixed

Some of our most vulnerable children have been supported to access the curriculum, avoid exclusions

Some of our parents have developed the confidence to return to work

Ongoing need for significant pastoral care at Horn Park. The significant social care caseload and a few significantly troubled children took away significant amounts of time from some direct work with children. To address this we have set up nurture provision for our most vulnerable children and we have appointed a designated pastoral officer to undertake the work related to social care plans.

Discover Me had a significant impact whilst parents were on the course, but this was not sustained. The cost per parent was high. This years focus is on how we develop a sustainable ongoing model.

£63,983

Targeted Support – providing focused 1:1 and small group teaching to close learning gaps in core subject areas and raise the number of children exceeding national expectations

 

· Teacher  0.7

· Teacher 0.4

· Support Staff x 4

 

High

Gaps between children eligible for pupil premium and non pupil premium reaching expected levels were reduced.

This was a successful approach. There are however still fewer children entitled to pupil premium reaching above age expectations, and many children who continue to need the additional input to reach age expected expectations

£124,514

Improving attendance for disadvantaged groups

 

· Attendance officer to target key families

· Ensuring home visits and support is on offer

· Attendance celebrations – end of term award

Improve the participation of pupil premium children in a range of extended school provisions

High

Whilst there continues to be a small gap between the attendance of pupils eligible for pupil premium and those not eligible it has continued to close. There still remains a gap in children entitled to pupil premium and non-pupil premium in the attendance at after school clubs, and more pupil premium children are still amongst are persistent absentees.

This approach was successful. The systems in place need to continue to sustain improvement and reduce those gaps still in place.

£27,500